No horns please on reverse gear

It’s a sound thrashing of traffic cacophony, all right. First, there was a crackdown on loud honking, with the traffic police booking over 160 violators in the span of one week. Now, a similar initiative is being prompted by residents of Aundh for the reverse horn menace.

Dhananjay Rau, member of the Aundh Vikas Mandal who has initiated the awareness campaign against reverse horn, echoed the residents’ demands, saying, “I welcome the drive taken by the traffic police against pressure horns as it is a nuisance to society. However, I feel a blatant use of reverse horns should also be curbed. According to the Motor Vehicles Act 1988, use of reverse horns is illegal. But, sadly, not many vehicle users know about it; they keep using the reverse horn and continue to disturb other residents.”

A few months ago, members of Aundh Vikas Mandal had started a campaign where they pasted pamphlets on vehicles which have reverse horns around the neighbourhood. “The pamphlet contains the Motor Vehicle Act rule and possible action vehicle users can face if it’s violated. Through these pamphlets, we are requesting vehicle users to remove the reverse horn,” Rau said.

Residents of other areas are also demanding similar action. Neelkanth Bajaj, president of Bavdhan Residents’ Forum, said, “The sound of the reverse horn is irritating and disturbs sleep. Traffic police should undertake a special drive like the one against regular horns as only a strict move such as this will discourage vehicle users.”

Navin Verma, member of Kalyaninagar Residents Group, spoke of the practical problems in identifying reverse- horn offenders. “We understand it will be a huge task for traffic police to pin down vehicles, which have reverse horns as it is generally used when the vehicle starts moving from a stationery position. Deployment of traffic police in parking lots is unlikely. So, citizens should be involved to track such vehicles. Police should appeal to citizens for sending them the vehicle registration number of any fourwheeler they encounter, which uses the reverse horn. That will make it easier for cops to take action,” he said.

Deputy commissioner of police (crime) Sarang Awad welcomed the suggestion. “We will surely respond to their demands positively. I appeal to all citizens to post the vehicle registration numbers of such cars along with their locations on the Pune traffic police’s Facebook page. I will immediately instruct my staff to take action against these vehicles,” he assured.

Source: Punemirror,  14′ March

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Horn ‘NOT’ OK please!

Pune which has the maximum number of two-wheelers in the world! And if someone takes a noise-o-meter and measures, Pune will top it too! Alarmed by cars, unnecessarily blowing horns on the city roads are adding to the noise pollution level of city. The ill effects of noise pollution were well known, too much of honking was also an exhibition of a person’s impatient temperament. But in a city like Pune it’s not possible to drive without honking. Even though there is a good footpath, pedestrians do not use it and walk on the road and they behave as if they are using footpath. These brainy people choose to walk three or four in a row with their backs facing oncoming traffic. Now if a person does not honk in this situation it’s bound to be a recipe for disaster. The best part is those brainy people give bad stares at you. As the countdown progresses steadily at red signals, and as the number approaches single digits, many two wheelers and some cars in the front row have already taken off and if we wait for the green light to come on, people from behind start honking horns repeatedly. These days one may have come across various other types of irritating horns. Some sounding like an injured donkey and some with various bollywood songs tunes. These should be banned and those using it. The honking cannot be totally eradicated as there are some people who honk for no reason and you can’t monitor everyone everywhere. All the automobile companies be it two-wheelers, four-wheelers and even three-wheelers should follow a guideline for the noise intensity of the horns for their vehicles manufactured. Rules should be implemented for honking on the traffic signal stoppages. Hoardings depicting ill effects of honking should be put up as part of social service advertising should be put up all across the cities specially the traffic signals.

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No horns please on reverse gear

imagesIt’s a sound thrashing of traffic cacophony, all right. First, there was a crackdown on loud honking, with the traffic police booking over 160 violators in the span of one week. Now, a similar initiative is being prompted by residents of Aundh for the reverse horn menace.

Dhananjay Rau, member of the Aundh Vikas Mandal who has initiated the awareness campaign against reverse horn, echoed the residents’ demands, saying, “I welcome the drive taken by the traffic police against pressure horns as it is a nuisance to society. However, I feel a blatant use of reverse horns should also be curbed. According to the Motor Vehicles Act 1988, use of reverse horns is illegal. But, sadly, not many vehicle users know about it; they keep using the reverse horn and continue to disturb other residents.”

A few months ago, members of Aundh Vikas Mandal had started a campaign where they pasted pamphlets on vehicles which have reverse horns around the neighbourhood. “The pamphlet contains the Motor Vehicle Act rule and possible action vehicle users can face if it’s violated. Through these pamphlets, we are requesting vehicle users to remove the reverse horn,” Rau said.

Residents of other areas are also demanding similar action. Neelkanth Bajaj, president of Bavdhan Residents’ Forum, said, “The sound of the reverse horn is irritating and disturbs sleep. Traffic police should undertake a special drive like the one against regular horns as only a strict move such as this will discourage vehicle users.”

Navin Verma, member of Kalyaninagar Residents Group, spoke of the practical problems in identifying reverse- horn offenders. “We understand it will be a huge task for traffic police to pin down vehicles, which have reverse horns as it is generally used when the vehicle starts moving from a stationery position. Deployment of traffic police in parking lots is unlikely. So, citizens should be involved to track such vehicles. Police should appeal to citizens for sending them the vehicle registration number of any fourwheeler they encounter, which uses the reverse horn. That will make it easier for cops to take action,” he said.

Deputy commissioner of police (crime) Sarang Awad welcomed the suggestion. “We will surely respond to their demands positively. I appeal to all citizens to post the vehicle registration numbers of such cars along with their locations on the Pune traffic police’s Facebook page. I will immediately instruct my staff to take action against these vehicles,” he assured.